Eric Maslowski, Technical Creative Consultant


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Building a New Rome: The Imperial Colony of Pisidian Antioch

From January 13 to February 24, 2006 at the Duderstadt center on the University of Michigan north campus, the Kelsey Museum mounted an exhibition on the Roman site of Antioch of Pisidia in Asia Minor (Turkey) a Hellenistic city refounded by Augustus in 25 BC as a Roman colony. Located along a strategic overland artery between Syria and the western coast of Asia Minor, Pisidian Antioch served Rome's military needs but also presented a striking symbol, from the Roman perspective, of the benefits that Roman civilization provided to local populations. The city is best known to the modern world as a destination on the first missionary journey of St. Paul and Barnabas in the 1st century AD, recounted in the Book of Acts.

Held at the Duderstadt Center Gallery at the University of Michigan, the exhibition featured a physical model created with a University of Michigan 3D Lab's Rapid Prototyping servces. Digital reconstructions of the buildings and topography were displayed using the Virtual Reality CAVE which conveyed a sense of the original monumentality of the site and the character of its setting.

In 2011, the exhibit was reopened in the Kelsey Museum at the University of Michigan. For this exhibit the animation's lighting was updated along with converting the entire sequence to stereoscopic 3D.

Original event site: Building a New Rome: The Imperial Colony of Pisidian Antioch

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